verbal

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verbal

adjective audible, expressed, nuncupative, oral, parole, pronounced, recited, spoken, stated, unwritten, uttered, verbum, voiced, vox
Associated concepts: Statute of Frauds, verbal acts, verbal agreements, verbal contracts, verbal gift, verbal no fault threshold
See also: loquacious, nuncupative, oral, parol

VERBAL. Parol; by word of mouth; as verbal agreement; verbal evidence. Not in writing.

References in periodicals archive ?
The other point we need to make is that the verb go has been used only as an illustration to avoid confusion.
Unlike the third person singular number (he, she, it), all other persons and numbers take the form of the verb without the s or es: 18) They speak good English.
These arrangements share two features that prove crucial in searching for these verbs: Dickens places no element between the inverted comma closing the character's words and the speech verb, and speech verbs are in the past simple tense.
Therefore, specific concordance searches ('said, 'he said and 'she said) were also carried out in order to locate the occurrences of say, the reporting verb par excellence.
Silva Junior (2015) opposes Talmy (1985, 2000) and Levin and Rappaport Hovav (1992) proposals, claiming that BP motion verbs are not distinguished in path verbs and manner of motion verbs, since the same verb can convey either the path or the way the motion occurs.
According to him, the verb andar 'to walk' emphasizes the manner of motion in (1) and the path in sentence (2).
The difficulty of such verbs comes from the fact that their meaning is idiomatic and there is a mismatch between the idiomatic meaning and the meanings of the individual words in the verb.
There is also grammatical difficulty in using phrasal verbs because the learner must know whether the verb allows particle movement or not.
This study examined verb forms in the spontaneous speech by a group of 15 native Spanish-speaking children ages 3;6 to 5;6.
When the pronoun is a direct or indirect object of a verb or the object of a preposition, it is in the objective case (me, you, him, her, it, us, them, whom, whomever).
In conjunction with the JV, Scott Huennekens, with over 20 years in the medical device industry, has been named as Verb Surgical's president and CEO.
We aimed to identify a core or dominant sub-meaning for each individual verb, and to provide all the verbs in our databases with corresponding semantic labels.