vibrant

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References in periodicals archive ?
Of course one needs to resist the current American tendency to identify vibrancy with activity.
This vibrancy is, in part, thanks to the close working relationship between the council and all retailers which makes Newcastle the region's number one city location for shopping.
"There will have been the cynics, the nay-sayers and the people who said 'why are you bothering with this?' but the point is, it all adds so much more to the town in terms of vibrancy and excitement that you can't achieve in any other way."
"Beacon Tower will truly be one of DUMBO's premier residential properties upon completion, and we are proud to contribute to the vibrancy and overall quality of life in this dynamic Brooklyn community."
* PureOlogy Serious Colour Care, Irvine, CA, uses Nano Technology to enhance hair color vibrancy, strengthen, moisturize and improve hair conditions.
Also featuring the voices of Angelina Jolie, Robert De Niro and Jack Black, this has interesting animation and an infectious vibrancy about it.
Director of concept architects Benoy states: 'We specified Armourcoat for its vibrancy and depth of colour, and because it is extremely tough and durable'.
Local council tourism officer Steve Hopkins said, ``It's a sign of the vibrancy of Neath that this local hotel is making such a large investment and it can only be good for the area.''
Could her vibrancy and good looks be down to the fact that work commitments keep Mr P.
Sir, - A note to Lord Corbett and Dr Heeley: a city's vibrancy is governed by the people living in it.
Inspired by a series of impressionistic paintings by Claude Monet, and set to several of composer Claude Debussy's solo works for piano, American Ballet Theatre Ballet Master Kirk Peterson's world premiere of Dancing with Monet--A Gathering at Argenteuil sought to capture the vibrancy and emotion of the painter's work.
Herein lies what Truant believes is the reason for both the continued vibrancy of compagnonnage in the nineteenth century and its ultimate marginalization and decline.