vicinage


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.
References in periodicals archive ?
More precisely, "venue refers to the locality in which charges will be brought and adjudicated, [and] vicinage refers to the locality from which jurors will be drawn." (135) Thus, venue and vicinage do not necessarily have to overlap, but in practice the vicinage right to a jury from a particular district "also grant[s], by implication, a parallel right to be tried in that judicial district." (136)
Indeed, in the same decision quoted above, the Chief Justice wrote, "To what end must hundredors be of the jury, whom the law supposeth to have nearer knowledge of the fact than those of the vicinage in general?" Id.
These include shifts in the allocation of the law-and fact-finding functions; the duration and frequency of trials; and the jury's composition and vicinage. This Section charts these changes and their relationship with the external transformations discussed in Section A.
The Stamp Act Congress of 1765 declared: 'trial by jury is the inherent and invaluable right of every British subject in these colonies.' The First Continental Congress a decade later echoed the same view: 'the respective colonies are entitled to the common law of England, and more especially to the great and inestimable privilege of being tried by their peers of the vicinage, according to the law course of that law." Finally, when the colonies cast off obedience to the Crown in the Declaration of Independence, they listed as a key grievance denial of 'the benefits of trial by jury.' In the Revolutionary Era the jury was the voice of the people, the democratic outlet for sentiments otherwise stifled by an Imperial bureaucracy unwilling to heed the opinions of the governed.
Their information is on oath, is public, it is in the vicinage of the party charged, & can be at once refuted.
The rectangular-looking vicinage abuts the original Confederacy, sitting barely a stone's throw from King Cotton's dark, fertile motherland.
The rectangular-looking vicinage abuts the original Confederacy, sitting barely a stone's throw from King Cotton's dark, fertile motherland; accordingly, it naturally identifies with Deep South art, history, culture and cuisine.
14, 1774, http://avalon.law.yale.edu/18th_century/resolves.asp [http://perma.cc/QQT4-GB6K] (claiming the right to "the common law of England"; asserting that American rights were based on "the immutable laws of nature, the principles of the English constitution, and the several charters or compacts" of the various colonies; that the colonists retained the "rights, liberties, and immunities of free and natural-born subjects, within the realm of England"; and that these rights included the right to "the common law of England, and more especially to the great and inestimable priviledge of being tried by their peers of the vicinage, according to the course of that law").
As shown in Figure 6, as soon as the boreholes are drilled, casing pipes are installed in the boreholes from top to the vicinage of the fault zone in order to seal off the test section from other parts.
at 520-24 (discussing the common law rules of venue and vicinage).
2445, 2476 (2002) (citing the proposed amendment of George Mason: "[t]hat in all capital or criminal prosecutions a man hath a right to demand the cause and nature of his accusation, to be confronted with the accusers and witnesses, to call for evidence in his favor, and to a speedy trial by an impartial jury of twelve men of his vicinage, without whose unanimous consent he cannot be found guilty; nor can he be compelled to give evidence against himself, that no man be deprived of his liberty, except by the law of the land or the judgment of his peers.").