VIS

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VIS

[Latin, Force or violence.] A term employed in many legal phrases and maxims, such as vis injuriosa, "wrongful force."

West's Encyclopedia of American Law, edition 2. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

VIS. A Latin word which signifies force. In law it means any kind of force, violence, or disturbance, relating to a man's person or his property.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
With a well-chosen name and a marketing plan, a newspaper is ready to promote its voice information services to the public.
In voice services, it has deliberately entered what Craig Allsopp, assistant director of Dow Jones Voice Information Services, referred to as "calculated conflicts," catering to ad supported, pay-per-call and subscription markets to position the company for whichever market takes off.
Directory publishers, on the other hand, have struggled to make a business out of front-of-the-book (FOB) voice information services, or back-of-the-book (BOB) audiotex sections supplied and updated by the advertisers themselves.
"Despite the economy and its horrible impact on advertising revenues, despite the uncertainty about the role the regional Bell operating companies (RBOCs) will play in voice information services, the number of newspapers offering voice information services is increasing dramatically, to the point there are today 1,200 papers," said John F.
In 1991, many newspapers either began their foray into audiotex or chose to enhance their already existing voice information services by offering voice personals to their respective communities.
The winners in voice information services will be those newspaper companies which determine their objectives, understand the marketplace, and develop a strategy based on that knowledge.
The products use voice information services directly tied to print media - talking ads, conventional audiotext information, polls and surveys and local information lines.
While newspapers are adding voice information services at a remarkable pace, there is no clear-cut formula for success.