vote

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vote

noun ballot, chirotony, choice, choosing, determination, election, formal expression of choice, judgment, option, pick, poll, predilection, preference, punctum, selection, sententia, suffragium

vote

verb approve, ballot, be counted, cast a ballot, cast a vote, choose, elect, exercise the right of suffrage, judge, poll, suffragium ferre
See also: cast, decide, franchise, plebiscite, poll, primary, referendum, register

VOTE. Suffrage; the voice of an individual in making a choice by many. The total number of voices given at an election; as, the presidential vote.
     2. Votes are either given, by ballot, v.) or viva voce; they may be delivered personally by the voter himself, or, in some cases, by proxy. (q.v.)
     3. A majority (q.v.) of the votes given carries the question submitted, unless in particular cases when the constitution or laws require that there shall be a majority of all the voters, or when a greater number than a simple majority is expressly required; as, for example in the case of the senate in making treaties by the president and senate, two-thirds of the senators present must concur. Vide Angell on Corpor. Index, h.t.
     4. When the votes are equal in number, the proposed measure is lost.

References in periodicals archive ?
A dissolution very manifestly should not be granted when its effect is to avoid a vote of censure.
The violence in Gujarat triggered national outrage, prompting the withdrawal of one of the parties from the fragile 20-party coalition over the issue, as well as a vote of censure by the opposition in the Lok Sabha House of Parliament.
He was responding to attacks by Tory leader Nick Bourne who demanded Ms Gwyther's resignation and accused Labour of being "arrogant, undemocratic and dangerous" in ignoring the majority vote of censure.
But the deal has attracted widespread criticism - culminating on Tuesday in the passing of a unanimous vote of censure on the bank by councillors in its home city, Edinburgh.
It is argued there is no precedent for an arrangement such as a vote of censure and a fine, but then the President is in a unique position which may call for the establishment of a new procedure which falls short of the ultimate sanction of dismissal from office.
The Connecticut senator said he hoped that some kind of ``public rebuke,'' such as a congressional vote of censure, ``will be the maximum we will want to do to end this sad chapter in our history.