Suffrage

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Suffrage

The right to vote at public elections.

SUFFRAGE, government. Vote; the act of voting.
     2. The right of suffrage is given by the constitution of the United States, art. 1, s. 2, to the electors in each state, as shall have the qualifications requisite for electors of the most numerous branch of the state legislature. Vide 2 Story on the Const. Sec. 578, et seq.; Amer. Citiz. 201; 1 Bl. Com. 171; 2 Wils. Lect. 130; Montesq. Esp. des Lois, Ii v. 11, c. 6; 1 Tucker's Bl. Com. App. 52, 3. See Division of opinion.

References in periodicals archive ?
The finance ministry is seeking approval from the cabinet to give proportionate voting rights to founders in private sector banks.
* The value of the voting right itself (control), after the adjustment for the company-specific factors.
In a situation in which state law and a corporate charter conflicted regarding voting rights, the court in Wurlitzer determined that state law prevailed.
(2) The net total of voting rights is equal to the gross total, minus the number of shares deprived of their voting rights (treasury shares)
UPM's registered total number of shares and voting rights amounting to 533,735,699 has been used in the calculation of percentages for this announcement.
Holder, the high court in 2013 gutted the portion of the Voting Rights Act that prevented dozens of jurisdictions with a history of discrimination against voters of color - including Texas and its municipalities - from changing their election laws without federal approval.
Only two years earlier, the Supreme Court, in a case from neighboring Shelby County, had largely undone the centerpiece of the Voting Rights Act.
Yet even as we celebrate, we must continue to fight against those who would roll back the gains of the Voting Rights Act.
a He worked with King to plan the voting rights marches.
The author of this book provides an excellent account and analysis of the 1965 Voting Rights Act and its political and legal consequences.
Not all foreign residents in the UK have voting rights either.
In late February, the United States Supreme Court will review Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act.