want


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Want

The absence or deficiency of what is needed or desired.

Want of jurisdiction, for example, is a lack of authority to exercise in a particular manner a power possessed by a tribunal or board.

want

noun absence, conatus, dearth, default, defect, deficiency, deficit, desideratum, desire, destitution, exigency, impoverishment, insufficiency, lack, meagerness, necessitude, necessity, need, neediness, paucity, pauperism, pennilessness, privation, request, requirement, requisition, scarcity, shortness, shortage
Associated concepts: want of capacity, want of consideraaion, want of jurisdiction, want of knowledge

want

verb be deficient in, be desirous, be destitute of, be found wanting, be without, covet, crave, desiderate, desire, fancy, feel the lack of, have occasion for, hope for, lack, like, long for, miss, need, request, require, stand in need of, will, wish
See also: absence, conatus, dearth, deficiency, demand, desideratum, desire, exigency, failure, foible, indigence, lack, market, need, omission, paucity, poverty, privation, request, require, requirement, requisition, will
References in periodicals archive ?
He's no mind reader though, so do tell him what you want. No hints.
Once the items are grouped into the common categories, the next exercise would be to classify the items into either being a need or being a want. The right split between needs and wants can be anchored on the financial goal and personal values of a person.
The six long-term suspects are wanted in connection with a string of alleged offences, including burglary, assault and fraud.
You want to travel more, but don't have the time or the money.
One shows a man wanted in connection with a making off without payment, Y Wern, Wrexham.
They are the UK's most "poszukiwany", Polish for "wanted".
THESE are the faces of suspected shoplifters and a burglar wanted by police after being caught on camera allegedly stealing from shops.
THESE are the faces of Britain's most wanted men - all on the run on the Costas.
"We typically want what we like, and like what we want," Smith explains, "but these results suggest that wanting and liking are processed by distinct brain circuits and may not always go hand-in-hand." Adds Berridge, "The brain seems to be more stingy with mechanisms for pleasure than for desire."
They voted for both Bushes, and they very much adhered to a belief system in which they wanted the government out of their bedroom, they wanted it out of their bodies, and they wanted it out of their pocketbook--they wanted fewer taxes, less regulation, all that.