Surgery

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Related to weight-loss surgery: Gastric bypass surgery

SURGERY, med. jur. That part of the healing art which relates to external diseases; their treatment; and, specially, to the manual operations adopted for their cure.
     2. Every lawyer should have some acquaintance with surgery; his knowledge on this subject will be found useful in cases of homicide and wounds.

References in periodicals archive ?
"A very important determinant of post-surgical success for any young candidate, however, is a support structure to help them with weight-loss surgery requirements.
Sean Woodcock, lead bariatric surgeon at North Tyneside Hospital, said: "The money spent on weight-loss surgery is not that much when it's predicted that by 2015 the cost to the NHS will be pounds 6.5bn a year in dealing with morbidly obese patients.
Mr Clark said: "Weight-loss surgery is often wrongly perceived as a cosmetic procedure, but bariatric surgery is only performed if the patient's health is threatened by obesity."
"To be accepted for weight-loss surgery at Murrayfield, people must meet certain criteria.
Currently, the most popular weight-loss surgery is gastric bypass, in which the stomach is divided into two sections by staples and a section of small intestine is connected to the smaller top section, or "pouch." The drawback to this and other weight-loss surgeries is a fairly lengthy recovery time and several risk factors, including a rare chance of death.
The National Bariatric Surgery Registry suggests serious complications occur in only 2.6% of cases with three post-operative in-hospital deaths in 2013 as a result of weight-loss surgery.
Legendary soul singer Aretha Franklin also hit the headlines earlier this year after losing six stone post-op, although she denies having weight-loss surgery.
I read your article on weight-loss surgery. I had it six months ago and I'm losing weight steadily.
Bariatric surgery, or weight-loss surgery, is used to treat people with potentially life-threatening obesity and that will not respond to non-surgical treatments.
Summary: There has been a 785 per cent rise in weight-loss surgery over five years, NHS figures have shown.
An obese man fighting for funding to have weight-loss surgery, claims it would be more convenient for the NHS if he died.