SEA

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SEA

abbreviation for SINGLE EUROPEAN ACT.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006

SEA. The ocean; the great mass of waters which surrounds the land, and which probably extends from pole to pole, covering nearly three quarters of the globe. Waters within the ebb and flow of the tide, are to be considered the sea. Gilp. R. 526.
     2. The sea is public and common to all people, and every person has an equal right to navigate it, or to fish there; Ang. on Tide Wat. 44 to 49; Dane's Abr. c. 68, a. 3, 4; Inst. 2, 1, 1; and to land upon the sea, shore. (q.v.)
     3. Every nation has jurisdiction to the distance of a cannon shot, (q, v.) or marine league, over the water adjacent to its shore. 2 Cranch, 187, 234; 1 Circuit Rep. 62; Bynk. Qu. Pub. Juris. 61; 1 Azuni Mar. Law, 204; Id. 185; Vattel, 207:

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
From that moment to the present, the majority of the world's commerce and business has been carried on in English, attributable in large part to the fact that England went to sea.
Fisherman Francisco Vergara related to authorities here Tuesday that he went to sea at about 3 a.m.
Sources said that the number missing may be higher than 36, as there was no accurate record of the number of fishermen who went to sea on Friday night and early Saturday.
Shortly after the war started in September 1939, he went to sea with the Norwegian merchant service.
OUR MAGAZINE FULL OF MEMORIES: Young sailor Bert Ward, right, was just 17 when he went to sea and served on HMS Revenge during the war.
Mr Bartlett caused pounds 308,000 of damage to the 124-year-old Hythe Pier near Southampton docks when he went to sea after downing six pints in 2004.
FURTHER to the letter in Wednesday''s Daily Post about the heavy costs and potential dangers if Parliament decides to replace the Trident nuclear weapons system, a leaked memo last month revealed that, after on-land maintenance work at Plymouth Devonport, "two nuclear submarines went to sea with a safety defect that put the vessels at potential risk from radioactive material".
A few years ago, I filmed an interview with a local merchant seaman, Joe Deacon, who first went to sea, aged 14, in 1942.