References in classic literature ?
There was no one in the kitchen when Lisbeth entered and threw herself into the chair.
There's no comfort for me no more," she went on, the tears coming when she began to speak, "now thy poor feyther's gone, as I'n washed for and mended, an' got's victual for him for thirty 'ear, an' him allays so pleased wi' iverything I done for him, an' used to be so handy an' do the jobs for me when I war ill an' cumbered wi' th' babby, an' made me the posset an' brought it upstairs as proud as could be, an' carried the lad as war as heavy as two children for five mile an' ne'er grumbled, all the way to Warson Wake, 'cause I wanted to go an' see my sister, as war dead an' gone the very next Christmas as e'er come.
I hanna seen the lad this two hour--I'd welly forgot as he'd e'er growed up from a babby when's feyther carried him."
Hirst, whom she had disliked when she first met him, really wasn't disagreeable; and, poor man, he always looked so ill; perhaps he was in love; perhaps he had been in love with Rachel-- she really shouldn't wonder; or perhaps it was Evelyn--she was of course very attractive to men.
It was a good thing to have some occupation which was quite independent of other people, she said, when one got old.
Yes, this arm-chair was the same arm-chair in which Rachel had sat that afternoon when Evelyn came up, and this was the magazine she had been looking at, and this the very picture, a picture of New York by lamplight.
When supper was ready--and not before--she emerged from the bedroom, saying: "But you do love me, don't you?"
As she receded, a new set of interests possessed the boy, and he began to think of what had been said about music by that odd Miss Schlegel--the one that twisted her face about so when she spoke.
The interval of expectation, short as it was when reckoned by the measure of time, assumed formidable proportions when reckoned by the measure of suspense.
I own I closed my eyes at the moment when the point of the stick first entered the quicksand.
Tolstyakov, a friend of mine, is always obliged to take off his pudding basin when he goes into any public place where other people wear their hats or caps.
And it's bought on condition that when's it's worn out, they will give you another next year.