whistleblower

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whistleblower

a person, usually an employee, who reveals information, which he is contractually obliged to keep secret, because of an overriding public interest. The principle was recently introduced into the UK by the Public Interest Disclosure Act 1998, which has, for example, resulted in an accountant who was dismissed for exposing financial irregularities of his manager to the company headquarters in the USA being awarded not that much short of £300,000.
References in periodicals archive ?
Adeosun, however intervened at once, saying that the whistle-blower had actually not been paid due to some procedural bottlenecks.
In healthcare we must avoid making those who speak up the story, because such infamy distracts from the real need for learning and makes the whistle-blower the third victim.
She is using all the right words when it comes to the way whistle-blowers are treated.
However if the whistle-blower's direct evidence is critical to the disciplinary hearing then the organisation needs to consider what undertaking to provide anonymity it can give, if any, to a whistle-blower in such circumstances.
Employers may opt to reward whistle-blowers to encourage them, but that honesty should ideally not have to be paid for," Numann said.
HMRC has said it has no record of receiving an email or phone call from the whistle-blower in 2008.
LAST week The Health Select Committee announced that 'the treatment of whistle-blowers is a stain on the reputation of the NHS and has led to unwarranted, inexcusable pain for the courageous individuals affected'.
Their decision came after the whistle-blower produced evidence in the form of audio recordings.
In the study, the Work and Employment Relations Unit of the University of Greenwich analysed the experiences of 1,000 whistle-blowers who contacted PCAW's advice line between 20 August 2009 and 30 December 2010.
Given that all investigations into Richardson are closed, the whistle-blower protection law no longer applies, the newspaper argued.
The practice, described in a whistle-blower lawsuit in federal court in Worcester, allegedly established a phony patient address and a paper trail of dunning notices, so the hospital could then submit the bills to a state program for payment.
The first helpful whistle-blower received about $50,000 for his help in (http://www.