widower

(redirected from widowers)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Encyclopedia.

widower

n. a man whose wife died while he was married to her and has not remarried.

widower

a man whose wife has died and who has not remarried.

WIDOWER. A man whose wife is dead. A widower has a right to administer to his wife's separate estate, and as her administrator to collect debts due to her, generally for his own use.

References in periodicals archive ?
Deep down, most widowers don't want to live alone, as they are afraid of losing someone again.
Cogon, a coastal village of more than 3,200 people, became the locus of grief when the storm killed 158 villagers, making widows and widowers of more than 70 surviving spouses.
The message of The Widower's Guide is found in giving the widower permission to keep living.
THE widower of a Midland GP who said he was being discriminated against because he is a man has lost his landmark legal case against the Department of Health.
In Chapter 6, she shows that the Floridians were much more comfortable having women take initiative in relationships than were the Canadian widowers.
A MERSEYSIDE man has lost an eight-year campaign for equal rights for widowers.
If the ruling had gone in Mr Hooper's favour, it would have set a groundbreaking precedent for thousands of widowers who claim they have been discriminated against by the Government.
near Eglin Air Force Base, provides rent subsidy and other support to indigent widows and widowers of retired enlisted Airmen 55 and older.
Nieboer, Lindenberg, and Ormel (1999) found that older widowers scored considerably lower on measures of well-being than older widows for two years of bereavement following the death of a spouse.
Widowers are more uncomfortable than widows in planning social interactions and seeking help when needed (Lieberman, 1996; Lopata, 1982), and they are vulnerable to loneliness (Dykstra, 1995; Lund, Caserta, & Dimond, 1986; Stevens, 1995) and depressive symptoms during bereavement (Byrne & Raphael, 1999, Farberow, Gallagher, Gilewski, & Thompson, 1992; Lee, DeMaris, Bavin, & Sullivan, 2001).
Hundreds of would-be widows and widowers have applied for matrimony since.
Also, the 15% rate bracket for married taxpayers filing jointly and qualifying widowers has expand ed to twice that of single fliers.