Window


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WINDOW. An opening made in the wall of a house to admit light and air, and to enable those who are in to look out.
     2. The owner has a right to make as many windows in his house when not built on the line of his property as he may deem proper, although by so doing be may destroy the privacy of his neighbors. Bac. Ab. Actions in general, B.
     3. In cities and towns it is evident that the owner of a house cannot open windows in the partition wall without the consent of the owner of the adjoining property, unless he possesses the right of having ancient lights. (q.v.) The opening of such windows and destroying the privacy of the adjoining property, is not, however, actionable; the remedy against such encroachment is by obstructing them, without encroaching upon the rights of the party who opened them, so as to prevent a right from being acquired by twenty years use. 3 Camp. 82.

References in classic literature ?
They ran to the window, downstairs, and into the street.
Another voice, from a man of medium height with clear blue eyes, particularly striking among all these drunken voices by its sober ring, cried from the window: "Come here; part the bets!" This was Dolokhov, an officer of the Semenov regiment, a notorious gambler and duelist, who was living with Anatole.
There was a smell like rain in the still, heavy air, and I put my hand out of window. No.
"Who's there?" he said, also whispering, standing under the window and peering up.
"What is a dahabeeyah, Charles?" the distinct voice of a widow, seated in an arm-chair by the window, asked her son.
This done, I put the ladder against the house wall, listened, measured the distance to the open second-floor window with my eye, listened again--and, finding all quiet, began my second and last ascent.
Pinocchio had no hat, but he managed to get under the window just in time to feel a shower of ice-cold water pour down on his poor wooden head, his shoulders, and over his whole body.
"Look out of the window in about ten minutes and you'll see," the woman answered.
Grewgious, who had asked all these questions, with his preoccupied glance directed out at window.
"It is by that window that he escaped from the pavilion!" cried Rouletabille.
She had hoped, vaguely, that this window might have a screen, but it did not.
Peter and Benjamin flattened their noses against the window, and stared into the dusk.