Reason

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REASON. By reason is usually understood that power by which we distinguish truth from falsehood, and right from wrong; and by which we are enabled to combine means for the attainment of particular ends. Encyclopedie, h.t.; Shef. on Lun. Introd. xxvi. Ratio in jure aequitas integra.
     2. A man deprived of reason is not criminally responsible for his acts, nor can he enter into any contract.
     3. Reason is called the soul of the law; for when the reason ceases, the law itself ceases. Co. Litt. 97, 183; 1 Bl. Com. 70; 7 Toull. n. 566.
     4. In Pennsylvania, the judges are required in giving their opinions, to give the reasons upon which they are founded. A similar law exists in France, which Toullier says is one of profound wisdom, because, he says, les arrets ne sont plus comme autre fois des oracles muets qui commandent une obeissance passive; leur autorite irrefragable pour ou contre ceux qui les ont obtenus, devient soumise a la censure de la raison, quand on pretend les eriger en regles a suivre en d'autres cas semblables, vol. 6, n. 301; judgments are not as formerly silent oracles which require a passive obedience; their irrefragable authority, for or against those who have obtained them, is submitted to the censure of reason, when it is pretended to set them up as rules to be observed in other similar cases. But see what Duncan J. says in 14 S. & R. 240.

References in periodicals archive ?
In this case, we will need to understand their putative pre-parental reasons not as reasons to ensure their compliance with reasons that they will have to engage in parental partiality, but as reasons to ensure their compliance with reasons that they would have had had they acted otherwise.
We are faced with two marks of intentional action: its connection with reasons, and its connection with belief.
One task for a theory of intentional action is thus to articulate and defend an account of the "connection with reasons" that does entail (Belief).
Scanlon explains that those other properties that provide us with reasons are "natural" or "non-normative" properties (96).