Hypothesis

(redirected from working hypothesis)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Encyclopedia.
Related to working hypothesis: Null hypothesis

Hypothesis

An assumption or theory.

During a criminal trial, a hypothesis is a theory set forth by either the prosecution or the defense for the purpose of explaining the facts in evidence. It also serves to set up a ground for an inference of guilt or innocence, or a showing of the most probable motive for a criminal offense.

West's Encyclopedia of American Law, edition 2. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to Dixon, the working hypothesis for how stem cells exert their regenerative effects was wrong because transplanted stem cells don't stick around long in the recipient's body to replace damaged cells.
DCI Pack added: "The working hypothesis is we have someone targeting members of the hook-up community who have been found stupefied or dead with property missing from their homes.
"This substance does not cause all Type-2 diabetes, but our working hypothesis is that there are sub-populations of patients who might benefit from changing their diet or altering their gut microbiota to reduce the levels of imidazole propionate," said Fredrik Backhed, Professor at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden.
"This substance does not cause all type 2 diabetes, but our working hypothesis is that there are subpopulations of patients who might benefit from changing their diet or altering their gut microbiota to reduce the levels of imidazole propionate," said Fredrik Backhed, Professor of Molecular Medicine with a research focus on the role of gut microbiota in metabolism.
For every crime you need a theory and a motive and sometimes the two merge into a working hypothesis. My working hypothesis for what happened is based on the spat between King Henry II and the Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Becket, in 1170 when the king was so annoyed with the archbishop he said within earshot of his entourage, 'will not someone rid me of this turbulent priest?' He did not mean to have Becket murdered but his overzealous knights thought he did and murdered the archbishop in Canterbury Cathedral.
Chief Supt Chaudry, of Greater Manchester Police, added: "Our working hypothesis is it's probably a shotgun discharge.